No Pets Allowed Can Get Landlords Into Trouble

The “No Pets Allowed” rule can get landlords into trouble.

Before a landlord decides on a “No Pets Allowed” policy, they may want to think twice as a No Pets Allowed policy can be an issue with the courts and federal housing statutes.  Recently, the United States Department of Justice implemented stricter guidelines for service animals. 

When a tenant makes a request to accommodate their service animal, both federal and California laws require the landlord to take this request seriously.  According to California Government Code § 12955 (b), a landlord cannot ask whether the person is disabled, what kind of disability the tenant has or the severity of the disability.   

There is a growing segment of type of service animal known as the psychiatric service dog.  According to the Psychiatric Service Dog Society, it is estimated there are 10,000+ psychiatric service dogs.  This service animal is dedicated to those individuals diagnosed with post-traumatic stress, obsessive-compulsive disorder, bipolar, and major depression.

The category of service animal is taking on additional significance as our society continues to age, evolve and return from combat. 

For more information, check out Luciana’s recent article in the San Diego Community Apartment Association Magazine  http://www.sdcaa.com/May2011.pdf.  Luciana is the owner of www.petfriendlycommunities.com.  Her website is designed for landlords to post their pet friendly rentals and for tenants to be able to find pet friendly rentals. 

If you are renting with a pet, check out http://petfriendlycommunities.com/renting-with-pets/  and if you are a landlord and are willing to rent to tenants with pets, please visit http://petfriendlycommunities.com/renting-to-tenants-with-pets/

Please feel free to contact Einhorn Insurance at 858-336-4644 with questions or visit www.einhorninsurance.com.

One Response to No Pets Allowed Can Get Landlords Into Trouble

  1. Elizabeth Vogel September 9, 2011 at 10:43 am #

    How does a dog become certified as a psychiatric service dog?

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